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Our local Turner Syndrome group offers support and a sense of community to those dealing with TS. This support group provides opportunities for individuals with Turners Syndrome to celebrate successes and build friendships, as well as a safe place to discuss fears and troublesome experiences.


Parents of girls with TS gain information to help their daughters, and the chance to network both with other parents and with successful adult women with TS.​


Adults and young adults with TS have a place to discuss topics related to TS, connect with others and enjoy social events together with new friendships.


There is no cost to join, it's FREE!

Just sign up for the Newsletter above and you're in!


We hope to see you at our next event!

Events

Variety Show Benefit for Turner Syndrome

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April TBA, 2020

Join Us For An Evening Of Fun, Laughter And Great Entertainment! The Queen of All Saints Variety Guild will be performing a Variety Show to help raise money for Turner Syndrome Support of St. Louis!

Find out more

Turner Syndrome Annual Spring Picnic

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May 30, 2020

Join us for some good old fashioned BBQ! Rain or Shine! Please RSVP so we have a head count. Plan on bringing a side dish to share.

Find out more

Book Signing: "The Silent Syndrome"

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Date TBA, 2019

Join Cheryl at Noon for a book signing! This book is a heartwarming story of one TS woman's journey of agony and pain, acceptance, and unconditional love.   Written by Cheryl Jost, former Turner Syndrome Society of St. Louis Chapter President. Personalized autographed books will be for sale! 

Barnes & Noble Fenton

Commons Shopping Center

721 Gravois Road

Fenton, MO 63026

Find out more
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SET YOUR VCR/DVR!!

Be sure to check out Cheryl Jost's interview with Channel 5's Kay Quinn discussing Turner Syndrome!

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DATE: TBA
TIME: TBA

Channel 5 KSDK

What is Turner Syndrome?

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It is a chromosomal condition that exclusively affects 1 in 2000 girls and occurs when one of the two X chromosomes normally found in females is missing or incomplete. A simple blood test, called a karyotype, will check for the absence of all or part of one X chromosome.


Under-diagnosis and delayed diagnosis of TS is a real problem, with the average age of diagnosis at 15 years, arriving too late for life-altering treatments, early interventions, and most importantly health screenings for a potentially fatal heart defect. The main goal of awareness is to reduce the age of a girl being diagnosed with TS from middle school age to early elementary school age.


Some of the possible indicators of TS are: short stature (average height untreated 4’8”), frequent ear infections, delayed puberty, wide short neck, small jaw, triangular face, many moles, puffy hands and feet, high arched palate, verbally gifted, low set ears and hairline, lazy eye, broad chest, drooping eyes, dental problems, upturned fingernails, educational difficulties (particularly math), social issues and anxiety.


For an overview of Turner Syndrome from the following organizations: 

Turner Syndrome Global Alliance​ 

Turner Syndrome Foundation 

Turner Syndrome Society of the United States​ 

Donate

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All donations remain locally in the St. Louis and surrounding areas. ​​​


If you prefer to donate ​by check, please make it payable to 

"Turner Syndrome Support of St. Louis" and mail it to:
Turner Syndrome Support of St. Louis
c/o  Sandi Whitworth, Treasurer
113 Berg Crossing Drive
Augusta, MO 63332


Donate here

Contact Us

Turner Syndrome Support of St. Louis

13321 North Outer 40 Road, Town & Country, MO 63017

314-614-6474

amyzambrano@yahoo.com